Why I Just Dumped All My Subscriptions

How much do you spend on subscriptions?

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How much do you spend a month on subscriptions? I have been looking at my YNAB category for monthly subscriptions and I’ve noticed it is getting a little out of hand. Subscriptions have been around forever; from magazines to monthly deliveries of goodies and snacks, subscriptions are a convenient way to get what you want delivered to you for a fee.

The problem is, those subscriptions can add up. I have always had a personal love-affair with subscriptions. I love my Amazon Prime, for all the services I get and the free shipping alone, I think it is totally worth the annual fee. But there are other subscriptions I have had that were just a convenience and wasted money. At one time or another, (not all at once) I have had television streaming subscriptions,  beauty sample subscriptions, fitness apps, ancestry.com, an audible book subscription, kindle unlimited, Blue Apron and my cable and internet, which most consider a subscription service. If you total that up that is $325 a month in subscription services. WHOA!!! That’s a lotta moolata!!

Ajsubscriptions it is now, I have cancelled all my services.

It will be nice to take that extra $300 a month and stick it into my growing buffer. I even decided for the summer to cancel Blue Apron, we will be so busy that quick wraps and fresh fruit will be our main meal; plus if you live in a humid environment like me, you’ve got to be crazy to turn your oven on in the summer.

Cable and Internet is something that all financial gurus suggest you cancel; they almost make you feel guilty for having it! Yes, you can save $1200 or more a year if you don’t have it. Yes, you have so much more time to do things without mindlessly staring at your television. Yes, you can get streaming subscriptions that are cheaper than cable. Blah, blah, blah… I am financially secure enough, I’m keeping it, and I regret nothing!

Here’s the thing, if you have a service that you absolutely love, something you feel is totally worth the money and something you use every day and it doesn’t affect your bottom line, keep it! After all, it’s your money, don’t let people make you feel guilty how you use it. My rule is “How many hours do I have to work to pay for this? Is it worth my time?” That’s how I make many of my decision. I hope it helps you as well.

Tasty Tuesday:Garlic-buttered Kale

I know what you are thinking, “um, there is nothing ‘tasty’ about kale”, but you’d be wrong! I was recently introduced to kale and I really didn’t want to try it, especially since it reminded me of turnips and collards, which have never been my friend. But with some health issues looming, I had to figure out how to get more “greens” in my diet and less junk; but I didn’t want to break the bank either

I have learned eating healthier is less expensive than what you would think. I mean the whole reason I would share a recipe on a financial blog is for the money you can save, right? So I gave this recipe a shot and it is so good, I now cook it twice a week. It takes all of about seven minutes to cook and even my son will eat it. The best part about it is the cost, which is about$1.47 per person for 4 servings.

  • 2 cloves garlic – .79
  • 4 T butter
  • 1-1 1/2 bunch kale – $2.00
  • 1 T olive oil

Staple items: Olive oil – $4.00-$8.00, Butter $2.79-$4.88, salt & pepper-$3.00

  • Remove the ribs inside the kale and chop kale into bite sized pieces
  • Mince the garlic
  • Add 1 T olive oil to a medium high pan, add 2 cloves of garlic and a pinch of salt & pepper
  • sweat the garlic 1-2 minutes
  • Add the kale to the pan, add a pinch of salt and pepper, stir until the kale begins to wilt, add 1/4 c water and cook 1-2 minutes longer
  • Place a strainer over a bowl and empty the kale, garlic mixture into the strainer, press out as much liquid as you can; discard the liquid.
  • Heat the butter in the pan and place the kale back into the pan, coat the kale with the butter and cook another 1-2 minutes, adding another pinch of salt and pepper, taste it first, it tends to get salty!!
  • remove from heat and serve

This side dish goes great with a grilled or roasted meat. A small tenderloin will run $7-$10. If you are a two vegetable kind of family, add some steamed green beans at .99/lb. Your whole meal is $4.21 per person for 4 servings.

 

 

The Importance of a Buffer

age of money
YNAB ages your dollars, basically it is rate of spending vs. rate of deposit. Read more here.

Are you living paycheck to paycheck? I’d say many people do in an American society of debt overload and over indulgence do. We just weren’t raised to be savers. We look at our grandparents and great grandparents who still cut the bruised parts of fruit out and finish eating the rest and shake our heads. We think, “I will buy you a whole basket of peaches if you’ll just NOT EAT THAT!” We throw out vacuums when the belt breaks, think buying a brand new car on loan is cheaper than fixing the one that’s paid for and go pick up a burger at the local fast food joint when we just don’t want to cook. But saving is important, and over indulgence has entire generations in financial ruin. That’s why it’s important to create a buffer.

A buffer is a category you create in your budget; it’s rule four for my favorite budgeting software, YNAB. It’s different than saving for rainy day expenses, those expenses that only come up annually, or on an as-needed basis, like doctor visits and vet bills (which you should be planning for them as well!) It’s the one to six month’s salary you save so you are no longer living paycheck to paycheck, and you add to it each and every paycheck. It can be a small amount, or it can be large, It’s totally possible and most people can raise a one month’s salary buffer within 6-9 months of budgeting.

The question is, why is it so important? There are many reasons why you want to have a buffer, number one being a little thing called Murphy’s Law, which the financial guru Dave Ramsey suggests always happens where money is concerned. Murphy’s Law is an old adage, “Anything that can go wrong will go wrong”.  What if you get fired, hurt, sick, there’s a death in the family, you have to have hip replacement, your car catches fire, your house catches fire, you hit someone with your car, and so on and so on. There are so many reasons to have that extra money handy, just in case those paychecks stop rolling in.

How much do you want to save in your buffer? Start with one and keep adding to it, you can never have too much “just in case” money. When I started using YNAB, I usually had about $30 on payday, debt, no savings, no investments, nothing. Now, three years later, we are debt free (minus our mortgage), we have an ever-growing, fully funded buffer , a separate emergency fund of $1000 and still manage to save for our 52 week savings plan. We did remove all but about $200 of our investments from Lending Club and Betterment and just put it in to savings and CD ladders. We still have the $200 because they were notes that wouldn’t sell on Lending Club so they’ll just sit there til they pay out, (one of my issues with Lending Club).

Where do you want to keep your buffer? You can keep it right in your checking account, along with your rainy day funds and your every day expenses funds.You can also consider moving it to a savings account, simply to earn a higher interest rate off of it. Either way, you want to have it tangible if you need it. YNABers aren’t usually fans of lots of accounts, it can get messy and confusing, but I am also not a fan of putting all my eggs into one basket, especially in this day with identity theft and debit card thieves out there. Basically, it’s your money, put it where you want it.

BONUS THOUGHT: You know those people who say you shouldn’t save while you still have debt? Well, I think they are wrong, especially in this particular circumstance. You may have a problem come up way before you will be out of debt, and if you need to choose between adding an extra $10 to your credit card payment and adding an extra $10 to your buffer, until it’s funded with at least a month’s worth of wages, I would choose the buffer.

MVelopes: Is it Worth the Money?

MVelopes is a great product for the price if used correctly.

As many are struggling in today’s market, they search for options to help  maintain finances. One of these products is MVelopes.  MVelopes is an on-line module that helps you sync all of your accounts into one place, maintaining each and every transaction you make. Payments options are a plenty, ranging from quarterly to annually. MVelopes helps make a spending plan by creating categorized funded envelopes. Options to move money as needed is available as well as transferring money from one account to another. MVelopes has a great bill pay feature, included in your price, saving you money.
MVelopes also has pay – per – session  money classes, teaching  how to best use  finances to save more money and to get out of debt. The classes are optional and reasonably priced.                                                                     MVelopes is a great product for the price if used correctly. For those who use the product, moving money to and from envelopes without ever sticking to their plan, it’s an expensive arcade game.  Mind you, not all banks are compatible and if your account is not, you must manually enter your transactions, but it is still  a good way to keep your checkbook balanced electronically and budget.  Mvelopes has a support team that  is phenomenal and help to solve any problem you may have as well.
Perhaps the financial sessions would be the best service for the price. Everyone could use more knowledge in how to spend their money and how to save it, and the sessions are not as long asa product such as “Financial Peace University”, a Dave Ramsey program. So the question remains, is MVelopes worth the money?  In a time where every penny counts, If you must use a module to control your finances, MVelopes is a good one; however, if you are not disciplined enough to follow the program, save your money and spend it elsewhere.